Outlander

By: Diana Gabaldon
Outlander Series Book 1
1991
Fiction
Rating: 4/5

 

Outlander book cover

I’m actually very shocked I gave Outlander a four-star rating.

I was given this book to read on vacation by a friend who started it but couldn’t bring herself to finish it.

It’s raunchy. 

But between the graphic and unnecessary sex scenes and vulgar language and bedroom intimacies, there’s a pretty good story here! A fairly weird and dramatic story, but intriguing nonetheless.

Outlander is the epically long tale of Claire Randall, a young British woman from the 1940s who mysteriously gets transported back in time to 1740s Scotland. The rest of the book is her alternately trying to stay alive in the 18th century, get back to the 20th century, and control her feelings of guilt, lust, sorrow, anger, and love.

It’s a bit much for me. Every scene is overly dramatic and there’s not one climax but several. Several of those “this character has to do this one very particular deed they don’t want to or ordinarily wouldn’t be able to in order for life to keep going as it is.” So many moments of saving the world, or at least saving a private world.

But all that said, I ate this book up.

It’s since been turned into a Starz television show, and there’s several more books in the Outlander series, so I must not be the only one who enjoys it.

The book ends satisfactorily, but there are also so many obvious directions Gabaldon can take in the sequels. It intrigued me enough that I added the others to my ever-growing To Read list.

So if you don’t mind the bawdy nature of the book, I actually really suggest it! It’s a great summer beach read – trust me, it’s long enough to last you a good while. It’s got enough history and mystery to draw you in, and enough character development to keep you interested.

Let me know what you think!

 

*****

 

If you like Outlander, here are some similar novels:

(for more by Gabaldon)

Dragonfly In Amber by Diana Gabaldon

The Fiery Cross by Diana Gabaldon

Voyager by Diana Gabaldon

(for romantic historical fiction)

Daughter of Fortune by Isabel Allende

(for raunchy chick lit)

Remember Me? by Sophie Kinsella

Isle of Dreams by Elizabeth Dawson

(for themes of time travel)

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger

 

Coming up:

Dylan Thomas by Paul Ferris

Great Irish Humor by Peter Haining

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *